Gardening


My friend and frequent collaborator Brent Aldrich sent me this photo and story this evening.  Thanks, Brent!

The reason that squash seed packages recommend planting different varieties of squash 1/2 mile apart is because they “will cross-pollinate.” Of course, most of us [in urban places] don’t have the rolling acres of land where this is possible, so I never consider that as even a possibility. This year, a pumpkin plant has grown out of the compost pile (which tends to happen most every year), but with the summer squash I planted in the yard, they have created this mutant vegetable. Still don’t know what to call it: a Yellow Summer Pump-Squash? A Squash-kin?… The form of a pumpkin, but the texture of a crookneck squash; I can’t wait to see what it’s like inside.

Once again, I’m finding that I don’t post here as much as I’d like.  Lots of relevant stuff going on, but I never seem to find the time to sit down and write about it.

Seems like we are now making the typical Central Indiana leap from Winter to Summer.  We had snow flurries on Wednesday, and now yesterday and today temperatures are in the 80’s.   The apparent lack of spring is one of the few things that I don’t particularly like about the weather here.

The steady rains that we’ve had for the past few weeks, coupled with the warmer turn in the weather, have been really good for our plants.  Tomatoes, peppers and sunflowers are starting to peek out of the ground in their starter pots, lettuce and spinach has been coming up nicely in the garden.  On Friday night we had our regular dinner with our friends and neighbors and we brought a huge salad of lettuce and spinach — this was stuff that survived the winter under plastic and then really took off once we pulled the plastic off in March.  Man, that salad was tasty!  Mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm…

Life got all topsy-turvy with Noah’s cancer diagnosis, and I’m still not used to my new schedule, but at least with the warmer weather, I’m starting to feel more motivated to be outside.

This week, we’ve started to get the backyard gardens ready for the growing season.  (Maybe I’ll post in the near future on the connections between urban naturalism and urban agriculture.)   I made a new rain barrel for our backyard; our old one had frozen over the winter and cracked open (chalk up a lesson learned!).  We had a good rain that filled the rain barrel.  I pruned our two apple trees for the first time, after getting advice from a couple of books on this subject.  Time will tell how good my pruning job was.  Jeni cleaned out out the dead plants in the square foot garden.  I pulled off the plastic covering our side garden bed, and lo and behold, was astonished to find a large spinach plant and several lettuce plants that had survived the harsh winter.  Tonight, I gave the apple trees and spinach/lettuce plants a good watering (emptying the rain barrel) and then got the barrel seated on a better footing.

There was a workday last Saturday in the community garden and a ton of stuff was done there to kick off the growing season!  It’s so exciting to be coming out of winter and to dream of all the tasty produce that will — hopefully — be grown.

I’m also starting to think about how we can attract more birds.  Here’s a useful article that I’ve been mulling over (h/t: TLDB ).

Tomorrow, I hope to post the story and pix of our new and exciting adventures with the tree in yard of the house next door to us…  Stay tuned…

Today my friend and urban naturalism co-conspirator, Brent, and I got our shelves and grow lights together for getting the early seeds started for our community’s gardening adventures of the spring and summer.  We still have to buy bulbs for the light fixtures, but everything else is ready to go.  The next step is to test some of the seeds that we saved from last summer to make sure they will germinate.  This past year was the first time that we had saved seeds from tomatoes, peppers and melons, so I am eager to see how successful our seedsaving effort was.

We have three vacant lots that we will be planting this summer as community gardens and a number of people have gardens in their own yards.  The seeds that we will start indoors will eventually be transplanted to one of these gardens and some, I suspect, might be used in some “guerrilla gardening” projects around our neighborhood.  An essential part of urban naturalism — and one that perhaps distinguishes it from naturalism in other landscapes — is the intentional effort to find new ways to aid in the flourishing of natural life, flora and fauna, in one’s locale.   People complain about the lack of “nature” in urban settings, but what are they doing to help nature to flourish?  And furthermore, I think we have to have a vision of flourishing that goes beyond our own private properties.  (A number of my favorite writers have fleshed out this idea using the idea of “commonwealth,” especially Wendell Berry and Bill McKibben.  My friend Joe did a great review of McKibben’s Deep Economy last year that gets to the heart of the notion of commonwealth.)  So, guerrilla gardening is one way we are just starting to explore as a means to assist in the flourishing of public and vacant spaces in our urban neighboorhood.  Brent did an excellent review last week of Richard Reynolds’ recent book, On Guerrilla Gardening: A handbook for Gardening Without Boundaries.  It’s worth your time to look at that and I suspect that you will see much more here about our forays into guerrilla gardening as we roll into spring and summer.