Today my friend and urban naturalism co-conspirator, Brent, and I got our shelves and grow lights together for getting the early seeds started for our community’s gardening adventures of the spring and summer.  We still have to buy bulbs for the light fixtures, but everything else is ready to go.  The next step is to test some of the seeds that we saved from last summer to make sure they will germinate.  This past year was the first time that we had saved seeds from tomatoes, peppers and melons, so I am eager to see how successful our seedsaving effort was.

We have three vacant lots that we will be planting this summer as community gardens and a number of people have gardens in their own yards.  The seeds that we will start indoors will eventually be transplanted to one of these gardens and some, I suspect, might be used in some “guerrilla gardening” projects around our neighborhood.  An essential part of urban naturalism — and one that perhaps distinguishes it from naturalism in other landscapes — is the intentional effort to find new ways to aid in the flourishing of natural life, flora and fauna, in one’s locale.   People complain about the lack of “nature” in urban settings, but what are they doing to help nature to flourish?  And furthermore, I think we have to have a vision of flourishing that goes beyond our own private properties.  (A number of my favorite writers have fleshed out this idea using the idea of “commonwealth,” especially Wendell Berry and Bill McKibben.  My friend Joe did a great review of McKibben’s Deep Economy last year that gets to the heart of the notion of commonwealth.)  So, guerrilla gardening is one way we are just starting to explore as a means to assist in the flourishing of public and vacant spaces in our urban neighboorhood.  Brent did an excellent review last week of Richard Reynolds’ recent book, On Guerrilla Gardening: A handbook for Gardening Without Boundaries.  It’s worth your time to look at that and I suspect that you will see much more here about our forays into guerrilla gardening as we roll into spring and summer.

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