Last week, we discovered that the huge catalpa tree in the yard of the house just north of us (which is currently vacant and owned by the community development corp. that I work for) is completely hollow inside.

So hollow that one adult and several children can fit inside it!  So our kids and a lot of their neighborhood friends have been enjoying climbing in and out of the tree.   To get into the tree you have to climb up to the large, northward facing branch.  Here are our kids sitting in the hole that goes down into the tree:

From this hole, you lower yourself down into the hollow cavity.  An adult or older kid has to help the smaller children get in and out.   There is a little hole on the south side of the tree, and it is just big enough to put your face up to or stick a hand out of, either of which makes for a surreal sight!

The inside of the tree has the size and feel of a cave shaft — except, of course, being surrounding by rotting wood instead of stone.  Unfortunately, I am too big to get in and out of the tree, but our friend Brent Aldrich is able to get in (though its a tight fit around his shoulders), and we handed him a camera and he was able to take the following pictures.  The girl in the second picture is our friend and neighbor Harmony who is really good at getting into the tree and helping other kids to get in and out.

This tree has been an exciting find for our kids and for many others, and we will enjoy it while we can.  Being so hollow, this tree does pose a threat to the house whose yard it is in, and also to a number of power and phone lines (including ours), so it will have to come down eventually.

I have posted a bunch more photos of kids exploring this tree to my facebook page, but using this link anybody should be able to view them.

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A recent article from The Boston Globe emphasizes at least one reason why naturalism — both in the sense of seeking out nature and the sense of finding ways to help nature flourish, as I blogged about yesterday — is important in the city.

Some quotes:

A city is so overstuffed with stimuli that we need to constantly redirect our attention so that we aren’t distracted by irrelevant things, like a flashing neon sign or the cellphone conversation of a nearby passenger on the bus. This sort of controlled perception — we are telling the mind what to pay attention to — takes energy and effort. The mind is like a powerful supercomputer, but the act of paying attention consumes much of its processing power.

Natural settings, in contrast, don’t require the same amount of cognitive effort. This idea is known as attention restoration theory, or ART, and it was first developed by Stephen Kaplan, a psychologist at the University of Michigan. While it’s long been known that human attention is a scarce resource — focusing in the morning makes it harder to focus in the afternoon — Kaplan hypothesized that immersion in nature might have a restorative effect.

Long before scientists warned about depleted prefrontal cortices, philosophers and landscape architects were warning about the effects of the undiluted city, and looking for ways to integrate nature into modern life. Ralph Waldo Emerson advised people to “adopt the pace of nature,” while the landscape architect Frederick Law Olmsted sought to create vibrant urban parks, such as Central Park in New York and the Emerald Necklace in Boston, that allowed the masses to escape the maelstrom of urban life.

Although Olmsted took pains to design parks with a variety of habitats and botanical settings, most urban greenspaces are much less diverse. This is due in part to the “savannah hypothesis,” which argues that people prefer wide-open landscapes that resemble the African landscape in which we evolved. Over time, this hypothesis has led to a proliferation of expansive civic lawns, punctuated by a few trees and playing fields.

However, these savannah-like parks are actually the least beneficial for the brain. In a recent paper, Richard Fuller, an ecologist at the University of Queensland, demonstrated that the psychological benefits of green space are closely linked to the diversity of its plant life. When a city park has a larger variety of trees, subjects that spend time in the park score higher on various measures of psychological well-being, at least when compared with less biodiverse parks.

“We worry a lot about the effects of urbanization on other species,” Fuller says. “But we’re also affected by it. That’s why it’s so important to invest in the spaces that provide us with some relief.”

I’m thankful, I guess, that our neighborhood has a fair amount of trees and wildlife.  I was on a tour of the old IPS School #3 building this morning and we went up onto the third floor (one of the higher spots in our neighborhood) and looked out over our neighboorhood.  What I saw from that vantage point was mostly the tops of trees and for that I was thankful — especially since I had just read this article from the Boston Globe yesterday.  I would argue that even in the densest of urban areas, there is still natural life to be found — trees, birds, plants — but it is definitely sparser and as this article maintains, there are so many other demands for our attention that nature tends to get drowned out.